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To support thematic studies focusing on Warfare and British Society, Anglia has a range of multi-centre tours which explore the changing nature and experience of warfare

For those comparing medieval and modern warfare our 2-day tour to Agincourt and the Somme starts by exploring how Henry V‘s army used longbows and defensive ground to such great effect, challenging the accepted doctrines of warfare, before moving on to examine how trenches, barbed wire, artillery and machine guns combined in the Great War to Create a situation where the ‘poor bloody infantry' found their task almost impossible to achieve.

If your focus is the twentieth century then we can begin on the Ypres Salient by examining how trench warfare developed on the Western Front, looking in particular at the weapons available to the British Army at the time. This is followed by a day exploring the ground held by the British Army in 1940, where we consider the difference in preparations for this war and how Blitzkrieg theory, born in the final months of the Great War, shaped the conflict that would follow.

If you prefer, we can offer you a programme to a single location, like the Somme, where our expert guides will use the backdrop of the 1916 battlefied to explore how and where weaponry, tactics, communication and the experience of the ordinary fighting man changed during the Great War, through the conflicts of the twentieth century to the modern day.

Meeting exam board specifications. Our tour content is mapped against the major examination board specifications for KS3 to KS5 students.

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Tour Details

Curricular Links

Curricular Links

GCSE

  • Pearson Edexcel Thematic Study: Warfare and British society, c1250–present
  • OCR Thematic study: War and British Society c.790 to c.2010
  • WJEC EDQUAS Thematic study: The Development of Warfare in Britain, c.500 to the present day

IGCSE

  • Pearson Edexcel
    • Breadth Study: The changing nature of warfare and international conflict, 1919–2011
    • Themes in breadth with aspects in depth: The changing nature of warfare, 1859–1991: perception and reality
A Level
  • Pearson Edexcel Themes in breadth: The British experience of warfare, c1790–1918
  • OCR Thematic Study: The Changing Nature of Warfare 1792–1945

Key Themes

Key Themes

  • The composition of armies across time
  • The relationship between infantry, cavalry and artillery over time
  • The changing nature of firepower, and its impact on tactics
  • The impact on warfare of developments in technology, including weaponry, transport and communication
  • How recruitment changed over time
  • The impact of war on civilians
  • The nature of trench warfare and Blitzkrieg

Key Locations

Key Locations

  • Agincourt Visitor Centre
  • Sites of the French and English Camps
  • French burial site and Memorial
  • Lion Mound
  • 1815 Memorial Museum
  • Hougoumont
  • Sheffield Memorial Park
  • Newfoundland Memorial Park
  • Lochnagar Cater
  • Thiepval Memorial
  • Bayernwald Trenches
  • Tyne Cot
  • Langemarck German Cemetery
  • Menin Gate
  • Cassel
  • Peckel Bunker
  • Bray Dunes
  • Dunkirk Harbour
  • Dunkirk Memorial

Price Includes

Price Includes

  • Fully guided
  • Tailor-made itinerary
  • Hotel/Hostel accommodation
  • All meals as shown on your itinerary
  • An exclusive coach for your exclusive use
  • Return crossings with ferry or Eurotunnel
  • Pre-tour presentation
  • 1 free teacher place for every 10 paying students
  • All entrance fees associated with your visit

The guides knowledge in all aspects of the war was fantastic, but we were particularly impressed with the information that they gave on the Somme (we were able to adapt part of the itinerary in order for us to visit a student’s relative's grave), so did a little walk from Sheffield Park to Sunken Lane, which was a lovely activity before moving on to one of the craters.

- Sir Graham Balfour School